National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

February 7 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. It is an opportunity to increase HIV education, testing, community involvement, and treatment among black communities.[1]

By the end of 2016, the CDC estimated that 476,100 African Americans had HIV, and 1 in 7 were not aware of their status. For every 100 African Americans with HIV, 61 had received some HIV care and 48 were virally suppressed. In 2018, the CDC reported that Black and African American people accounted for 13% of the U.S. population, but 42% of the 37,832 new HIV diagnoses in the United States.[2]

The theme for 2020 is “We’re in This Together,” which highlights the importance of social support when addressing HIV in the black community.[3] This support may come from friends, family, colleagues, and partners, and aims to promote working collectively to stop HIV stigma and encourage testing and treatment.

There are several challenges to HIV prevention in the black community, including socioeconomic issues such as limited access to high-quality healthcare, housing troubles, and HIV prevention education. There are also social barriers to overcome including stigma, fear, discrimination, and homophobia, both within the black community and within their larger communities.[4]

Caring Communities offers HIV testing and case management services to those living with HIV throughout Northeast and North Central Pennsylvania. Please feel free to contact us if you are in need of these services.


[1] https://www.hiv.gov/events/awareness-days/black

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/racialethnic/africanamericans/index.html

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/nbhaad.html

[4] https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/racialethnic/africanamericans/index.html