Scranton’s Latin Festival

Blog
This past weekend, September 29-30, the Lackawanna County Courthouse square was home to the annual Scranton Latin Festival. Blanca Fernandez organized the event that gathered multiple local performers, musicians, and vendors to come together and celebrate their Hispanic heritage. Fernandez says she wanted the festival to be multicultural and diverse “to promote harmony, love, tolerance, acceptance. Everything that’s needed nowadays.” On Saturday, attendees could watch performances from Noelia Otayza and Ludy Rosales, Champions of Marinera Norteña Peru, a Peruvian coastal dance. Also showcasing their heritage was Frank LittleBear and his family. LittleBear is from the Cree Nation and the founder of Red Visions Dance Troupe, a group dedicated to outreach, understanding, and education of Native American culture through performing arts. Sunday had a different lineup with several DJs playing Spanish…
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Today is National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

AIDS, Blog, HIV
March 20th is National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day! From nnhaad.org: "National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NNHAAD) is a national mobilization effort designed to encourage Natives (American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians) across the United States and Territorial Areas to get educated, get tested, get involved in prevention and get treated for HIV and AIDS. NNHAAD was founded in 2007 by three collaborating agencies whom at the time were called the National Native Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Network, which included Commitment to Action for 7th-Generation Awareness & Educations [CA7AE], Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc. [ITCA], and National Native American AIDS Prevention Center [NNAAPC]. The three network agencies were funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] to provide capacity building assistance to Native organizations, tribes, state health departments…
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February 7th was National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day!

AIDS, Blog, HIV
Please click the post link to see the image and full post! From this website for the holiday: "February 7, 2018 marks the 18th year for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), a national HIV testing and treatment community mobilization initiative targeted at Blacks in the United States and the Diaspora.  NBHAAD was founded in 1999 as a national response to the growing HIV and AIDS epidemic in African American communities. The NBHAAD initiative leverages a national platform to educate, bring awareness, and mobilize the African American community. NBHAAD has four key focus areas which encourage people to: Get Educated about HIV and AIDS; Get Involved in community prevention efforts; Get Tested to know their status; and Get Treated to receive the continuum of care needed to live with HIV/AIDS. The governing body of…
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October 15th was National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day!

AIDS, Blog, HIV
Please click the post title to see image and full post! October 15th was National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day! From this POZ Magazine article about the holiday: "Sunday, October 15, marks National Latinx AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD) 2017. Founded by the Latino Commission on AIDS, the day is an opportunity to raise awareness about HIV testing, treatment and prevention among the country’s Latino population. This year’s theme is “Be a Superhero. Defeat HIV.” The reason, according to a Latino Commission on AIDS press release, is that we all have superpowers and a role to play in fighting the epidemic, whether that means getting tested for HIV, practicing safer sex, becoming undetectable or taking Truvada as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention."
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Six Disparities Highlighting the Necessity of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

HIV, STDs
February is Black History Month. February 7th is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. This article from The Body highlights six disparities that make this day necessary. We must educate ourselves and others in an effort to end them! From the article: "Here are six things you need to know about the epidemic's impact on African-Americans: Black Americans account for nearly half of all new HIV infections each year, despite representing only 13 percent of the U.S. population. Black Americans are at higher risk of HIV exposure, not because they engage in more risk-associated behaviors, but because the prevalence of HIV is so much greater among black communities than among any other racial/ethnic group. While prevention efforts have helped reduce the annual number of new HIV diagnoses among African-Americans over the last…
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