Events

 


November is Trans* Awareness Month!
November 14th – 20th is Trans* Awareness Week!
November 20th is Trans* Day of Remembrance. Rest in Power. 

From GLAAD:

“Between November 14 – 20, individuals and organizations around the country will participate in Transgender Awareness Week to help raise the visibility of transgender and gender
non-conforming people, and address the issues the community faces. The final day of Transgender Awareness Week is Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR), an annual observance on November 20 that honors the memory of those whose lives were lost in acts of anti-transgender violence.

What is Transgender Awareness Week?

Transgender Awareness Week is a time for transgender people and their allies to take action and bring attention to the community by educating the public and advancing advocacy around the issues of prejudice, discrimination, and violence that transgender people face.

What is Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor her memory of Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.

Participate in Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year. See the TDOR website at www.transgenderdor.org.


November is also Smoking Cessation Month!

From POZ Magazine:

“Smoking cigarettes is a bad habit for anyone, but it’s especially harmful to people living with HIV. Smoking increases your risks of health problems such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and lung disease.

But let’s face it—quitting is hard! Some smokers successfully quit cold turkey, but most people try quitting several times before becoming smoke-free. Relapse is common because of the physical and psychological withdrawal. There’s no “right” way to quit, but here are some tips and tools that can offer you the best chance at success:

Get Help. Call 800.QUIT.NOW (800.784.8669) to reach the smoking quitline in your state. It’s free, and they’ll help you work out a quit plan. You can also visit http://smokefree.gov for more tools and advice on how to quit.

For more help on quitting smoking, read the full article here!


 

November 16th is National Rural Health Day!

From the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health:

“Rural communities are wonderful places to live and work, which is why over 60 million people – nearly one in five Americans – call them home. These small towns, farming communities and frontier areas are places where neighbors know each other, listen to each other, respect each other and work together to benefit the greater good. They are also some of the best places to start a business and test your “entrepreneurial spirit.” These communities provide the rest of the country with a wealth of services and commodities, and they are the economic engine that has helped the United States become the world economic power it is today.

These rural communities also have unique healthcare needs. Today more than ever, rural communities must address accessibility issues, a lack of healthcare providers, the needs of an aging population suffering from a greater number of chronic conditions, and larger percentages of un- and underinsured citizens. And rural hospitals – which are often the economic foundation of their communities in addition to being the primary providers of care – struggle daily as declining reimbursement rates and disproportionate funding levels make it challenging to serve their residents.

That is why the National Organization of State Offices of Rural sets aside the third Thursday of every November – November 16, 2017 – to celebrate National Rural Health Day. First and foremost, National Rural Health Day is an opportunity to “Celebrate the Power of Rural” by honoring the selfless, community-minded, “can do” spirit that prevails in rural America. But it also gives us a chance to bring to light the unique healthcare challenges that rural citizens face – and showcase the efforts of rural healthcare providers, State Offices of Rural Health and other rural stakeholders to address those challenges.

We know there is work to be done, but we also believe there is plenty to celebrate – and we invite you to join the celebration!

 


This page will feature upcoming events, and any necessary pertinent information about them. The page may be empty, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t doing anything, it just means previous events have come and gone, and upcoming events have not yet been finalized. For this reason, we ask that you check back with this page frequently, as the content may change with little to no prior notice. Thank you!